Coarage essay

     Over the past year, I have made a turnaround in my life.  Uncertainty concerning my future after college contributed to a steady academic decline freshman through sophomore years at UCLA.  But after a trip to Colombia to learn about my heritage and speak with relatives in medicine, it all turned around. It became clear to me that microbiology research was my calling.  Since then, I have maintained high scores and committed to a research lab.  I am set on majoring in Microbiology, Immunology, and Molecular Genetics and minoring in Spanish.  My career goal is to attain a . in Microbiology or Virology.  A challenge to these goals is paying for education.  My parents and I have buried ourselves in bank and school loans that will keep us burdened well into the future.  The Courage to Grow Scholarship would relieve some of this weight.  I have committed to my community through several projects.  I was involved in the club Invisible Children, which sought to raise awareness and fundraise to provide schools for children in war-torn Northern Uganda.  I felt the need to give the children of Northern Uganda a stronger voice in America.  I left this project to focus on improving my grades during sophomore year.  Now that my life has stabilized, I will be joining a new project focused on tutoring children of inner Los Angeles schools.  I believe that I should be awarded due to my academic improvement, clarity in academic goals, and commitment to my community.

Each of these concepts is important in itself, and every one of these virtues is an admirable quality, but when all of them blend together in one person, we discover the value, and power, of chivalry today. Modern-day knights should strive to keep these virtues alive in their own hearts, but, perhaps more importantly, they should work to bring these wonderful qualities out in the people they see every day — at home, in the office, at school or on the street corner. A person who lives by the code of chivalry in today’s world allows everyone to see their best qualities reflected in his or her shining armor.

Reviews were generally positive and a respectable amount of volumes were sold, but it did not become a bestseller until an edition was published in England. By 1896 the novel had gone through nine editions and Crane himself realized he was no longer "a black sheep but a star." A reviewer in the New York Press wrote "one should be forever slow in charging an author with genius, but it must be confessed that The Red Badge of Courage is open to the suspicion of having greater power and originality that can be girdled by the name of talent." Joseph Conrad, the famous author of Heart of Darkness (1899), wrote that Crane had written "a spontaneous piece of work which seems to spurt and flow like a tapped stream from the depths of the writer's being." Some critics, including the writer Ambrose Bierce, attacked the novel for, among other things, being too imaginative, depicting soldiers poorly, and lacking in a coherent plot and grammatical/syntactical purity.

Coarage essay

coarage essay

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