The speckled band by sir arthur conan doyle essay

Doyle also wrote four volumes of poetry and a series of stage works—his first was Jane Annie , an unsuccessful attempt at a libretto to an operetta, which he wrote with . Barrie . [5] Doyle was an enthusiastic supporter of the Boer War , and wrote two histories of the events. During the First World War he also wrote extensively on that conflict, both short articles and a six-volume history. Owing to the close successive deaths of his son and brother, Doyle turned to spiritualism and wrote extensively on the subject; [1] [3] his biographer Owen Dudley Edwards writes that at the time of Doyle's death in July 1930, while the writer "most wanted to be remembered as a champion of spiritualism and as a historical novelist, it is Sherlock Holmes who has continued to capture the imagination of the public." [1]

"We had a fine rock boa to play the title-rôle, a snake which was the pride of my heart, so one can imagine my disgust when I saw that one critic ended his disparaging review by the words, 'The crisis of the play was produced by the appearance of a palpably artificial serpent.' I was inclined to offer him a goodly sum if he would undertake to go to bed with it. The real fault of the play was that in trying to give Holmes a worthy antagonist I overdid it and produced a more interesting personality in the villain. The terrible ending was also against it."

The speckled band by sir arthur conan doyle essay

the speckled band by sir arthur conan doyle essay

Media:

the speckled band by sir arthur conan doyle essaythe speckled band by sir arthur conan doyle essaythe speckled band by sir arthur conan doyle essaythe speckled band by sir arthur conan doyle essay